Unit 5 Lesson 3 Animals & colours animalcoloursicon.gif

Give children text cards for animals. Hold up a picture flashcard for an animal and they show you the word.
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• Revisit phonic focus with on (see Units 1 and 3), using words from the story (see Lesson 2). Show the grapheme. Trace it in the air, pronouncing it at the same time. Ask children to watch the shape of your mouth carefully as you model the sound. Encourage them to imitate the sound and add a whole-body mime to illustrate it (such as a rounded shape, with their head down).
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Introduce the colour blanc (white). Re-read the story and ask children to respond (eg raise their hand or pass on a multi-link cube) each time they hear blanc.
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• Show pictures of each animal and describe the colour, eg Le cheval est noir (The horse is black). Show a text card for each colour and invite children to place them next to the correct animal picture. Keep these labelled pictures displayed for the children to use as a memory aid later in the session.
If this is the first time children have done colours stop here and practise colours do the rest next week.
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• Display text cards for the four verbs of movement, eg galope, court, sautille (hops), trottine (scurries), and read them aloud with actions. Ask children to match the verbs with the correct animal, eg Le mouton, qu’est-ce qu’il fait? (What does the sheep do?) to elicit Le mouton court. Some children may only be ready to give a one-word answer, eg court.
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• Organise the children into small groups. Give each group a text card for each of the verbs describing animal movement, eg sautille. Ask the question Qu’est-ce qu’il fait, le lapin? (What does the rabbit do?) The children look for the correct text card. Repeat the activity with the other animals.
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• Give children one of the animals to draw. They select the correct animal name and verb from lists on the board and copy-write these as a simple sentence, eg Le cheval galope (The horse gallops). They then copy-write Il/Elle est … (It is …) and choose the correct colour from the board. For some children, writing even one sentence will be a sufficient challenge. They will benefit from having individual word lists with picture prompts rather than copying from the board. Alternatively, give them some small slips with words to rearrange into a sentence. They can then stick these in their books.
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• Extension: Children write from memory familiar on words on mini-whiteboards.
Animals from the story game